Notification

HIV infection and AIDS-related deaths are notifiable conditions in all Australian States and Territories. In each jurisdiction designated persons (usually doctors and pathologists, but sometimes other health care professionals as well) must notify their respective State or Territory health authorities, who forward coded data to the National HIV Surveillance Program managed by the National Centre in HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research.

'Surveillance Program Standard Operating Procedures: National HIV/AIDS Case Reporting' is available at: https://kirby.unsw.edu.au/report/surveillance-evaluation-and-research-program-standard-operating-procedures-national-hivaids .

State Based Information

+ ACT

Relating to HIV Notification

Responsibility for Notification
  • Where a doctor or authorized nurse practitioner has reasonable grounds to believe that a patient has HIV or AIDS (Public Health Act 1997, section 102A(2)).
  • Where a doctor has reasonable grounds to believe that a dead person had, or may have had, HIV or AIDS at the time of death and the person was a patient of the doctor immediately prior to death, or was examined by the doctor after death
  • Where a pathologist has tested a specimen taken from a person for any reason and the test indicates the person has, or may have, HIV or AIDS, then notification must be made by the pathologist, or the person in charge of the laboratory at which the test was performed, or the pathologist’s employer, as the case may be (section 103);
  • Where the person is in charge of any hospital in which any patient has or may have HIV or AIDS (section 104);
  • Where a counsellor who has counseled a person believes on reasonable grounds that the person has or may have HIV or AIDS (section 105(1); or
  • Where a person who is responsible for the care, support, or education of someone else believes on reasonable grounds that the person for whom they are responsible has HIV or AIDS (section 105(2).
  • They must notify the chief health officer.
Mode of Notification
+ NSW

Relating to HIV Notification

Responsibility for Notification
  • Medical practitioners are required to notify the Director General of Health if they reasonably suspect a patient has AIDS, or when AIDS is reasonably suspected to be the cause of death on the basis of a post-mortem examination (Public Health Act 2010, section 54).
  • Pathology laboratories are required to notify the Director General of a confirmed HIV antibody positive test result (Public Health Act 2010, section 55).
Mode of Notification
+ NT

Relating to HIV Notification

Responsibility for Notification
  • If a medical practitioner diagnoses a person with AIDS (not HIV), the medical person must give specified information (as outlined in NT Government Gazette G48, 30/11/2005) to the Chief Health Officer or a designated medical officer (Notifiable Diseases Act 1999, section 8). (HIV, although notifiable, is notified by laboratories - see below)
  • If a pathology laboratory diagnoses a person with HIV infection, the person in charge must give specified information (as outlined in NT Government Gazette G48, 30/11/2005) to the Chief Health Officer or a designated medical officer (Notifiable Diseases Act 1999, section 16).
Mode of Notification
  • Notification includes a person’s name but name is not recorded on the NT notification data base.
+ QLD

Relating to HIV Notification

Responsibility for Notification
  • Doctors are required to notify AIDS diagnoses unless the examination was carried out in a hospital, in which case the person in charge of the hospital is responsible for notification (Public Health Act 2005, section 70).
  • Diagnoses of HIV infection must be notified by the Director of the pathology laboratory which performed the test. Requests received by laboratories for HIV testing must also be notified by the Director of the pathology laboratory (Public Health Act 2005, section 72 & 73).
Mode of Notification
  • Notifications to the Director-General may be given using an anonymity code (Public Health Act 2005, section 74).
+ SA

Relating to HIV Notification

Responsibility for Notification
  • A medical practitioner or pathology service must notify a suspected case of HIV or death resulting from HIV within 3 days of that suspicion having been formed (South Australian Public Health Act 2011, section 64 and South Australian Public Health (Notifiable and Controlled Notifiable Conditions) Regulations 2012 section 4 & section 5).
Mode of Notification
  • The Act requires reports to be made in a manner and form determined by the Chief Public Health Officer (South Australian Public Health Act 2011, section 64). All notifiable diseases, including HIV, are notified by name but recorded in the database by name code. The Act has extensive confidentiality provisions at section 99 and section 100.
+ TAS

Relating to HIV Notification

Responsibility for Notification
  • A medical practitioner or approved health care worker authorised by the medical practitioner must, as soon as possible after a positive HIV test result is obtained, inform the Secretary of the Department of Health in a form approved by the Secretary (HIV/AIDS Preventive Measures Act 1993, section 15).
  • Director may require any person or class of person, Agency or public authority to notify the Director of the presence in any sample of human tissue, substance of secretion of the human body of any notifiable disease (Public Health Act 1997, section 48).
Mode of Notification
  • Any notification of the result of an HIV test is to be in a form approved by the Secretary (HIV/AIDS Preventive Measures Act 1993, section 16).
  • The notification must be identified by the first 2 letters of the given name and the first 2 letters of the surname of the patient only. The full name of the patient must not be provided unless it is requested by the Director; and only the postcode and suburb of the area in which the patient lives must be provided. The full address of the patient must not be included unless requested by the Director (Guidelines for Notification of Notifiable Diseases, Human Pathogenic Organisms and Contaminants1, p.12).
+ VIC

Relating to HIV Notification

Responsibility for Notification
  • The person in charge of a pathology laboratory is responsible for notifying the Secretary of the Department of Human Services of the ‘probable presence’ of a pathogenic organism associated with a notifiable disease, including HIV (Health [Infectious Diseases] Regulations 2001, regulation 7).
  • Medical practitioners also have a duty to notify cases of persons they are attending who show evidence of, or have died with, or are carriers of notifiable diseases (see regulation 8).
Mode of Notification
  • Pathologists must only notify using the patient code, being the first two letters of the family name and the first two letters of the given name, sex, date of birth and residential postcode (Health [Infectious Diseases] Regulations 2001 regulation 7).
  • Medical practitioners must also use coded data (Health [Infectious Diseases] Regulations 2001 - schedule 4).
+ WA

Relating to HIV Notification

Responsibility for Notification
  • A medical practitioner or nurse practitioner who forms the opinion that a patient has HIV must notify the Executive Director of Public Health (Health Act, section 276 (1)).
  • If analysis of a sample at a pathology laboratory indicates that the patient from whom the sample was taken has or had an infectious disease, the responsible pathologist must ensure that the Executive Director of Public Health is notified (Health Act, section 276 (2)).
Mode of Notification
  • Notifications of HIV infection and AIDS diagnoses must not include the name, address, and telephone number of the patient, but instead must only include the first two initials of the patient’s given and family names, and the postcode of the area in which the patient lives. Identifying information (such as name, address, and telephone number) may be included in the notification to the Executive Director of Public Health if the patient consents, or the practitioner has reasonable grounds for believing that the patient may engage in behaviour likely to put others at risk of infection (Health Act, section 276a).

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